Dr. Haxton told one of his students, “To move in the bloodstream, fats need the help of phospholipids.” What would a good student say?

Here is the answer for the question – Dr. Haxton told one of his students, “To move in the bloodstream, fats need the help of phospholipids.” What would a good student say?. You’ll find the correct answer below

Dr. Haxton told one of his students, “To move in the bloodstream, fats need the help of phospholipids.” What would a good student say?
Yes. Nonpolar molecules aren’t compatible with water.
Not so. Fats are small enough to travel easily without help.

Right. Fats are too polar to travel alone in water.
You have it backwards. Fats help phospholipids to travel.
Sorry, Dr. Haxton! Help comes from cholesterol, not phospholipids.

The Correct Answer is

Yes. Nonpolar molecules aren’t compatible with water. Good choice! Water rejects nonpolar molecules such as fats, so fats travel inside particles that are coated with polar parts of phospholipids and proteins.

Reason Explained

Yes. Nonpolar molecules aren’t compatible with water. Good choice! Water rejects nonpolar molecules such as fats, so fats travel inside particles that are coated with polar parts of phospholipids and proteins. is correct for Dr. Haxton told one of his students, “To move in the bloodstream, fats need the help of phospholipids.” What would a good student say?

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