During action potential propagation in an unmyelinated axon, why doesn’t the action potential suddenly “double back” and start propagating in the opposite direction?

Here is the answer for the question – During action potential propagation in an unmyelinated axon, why doesn’t the action potential suddenly “double back” and start propagating in the opposite direction?. You’ll find the correct answer below

During action potential propagation in an unmyelinated axon, why doesn’t the action potential suddenly “double back” and start propagating in the opposite direction?
A. The previous axonal segment is in the refractory period.

B. Positive charges only move in one direction after they enter the cell.

C. New action potential generation near the soma repels previously generated action potentials, causing them to always propagate away from the soma.

D. The extracellular sodium concentration is too low around the previous axonal segment for an action potential to be (re)generated.

The Correct Answer is

A. The previous axonal segment is in the refractory period.

Reason Explained

A. The previous axonal segment is in the refractory period. is correct for During action potential propagation in an unmyelinated axon, why doesn’t the action potential suddenly “double back” and start propagating in the opposite direction?

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